Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae <p>Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education is a refereed scholarly journal committed to the dissemination of knowledge derived from disciplined inquiry in the field of adult and continuing education. CJSAE is published twice yearly for the Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/l'Association Canadienne pour l'Étude de l'Éducation des Adultes.</p> The Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education en-US Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education 0835-4944 <p>Authors of manuscripts accepted for publication will be required to assign copyright to the<em> Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes (CJSAE). </em>CJSAE requests that, as the creator(s)/author(s) of the manuscript your are submitting assign certain rights to the manuscript to the CJSAE in exchange for undertaking to publish the article in print and electronic form and, in general, to pursue its dissemination throughout the world. The rights the CJSAE requests are:</p> <ol> <li class="show">The right to publish the article in print and electronic form or in any other form it may choose that is in keeping with its role as a scholarly journal with the goal of disseminating the work as widely as possible;</li> <li class="show">The right to be the sole publisher of the article for a period of 12 months;</li> <li class="show">The right to make the article available to the public within a period of not more than 24 months, as determined by relevant journal staff of the CJSAE;</li> <li class="show">The right to grant republication rights to itself or others in print, electronic, or any other form, with any revenues accrued to be shared equally between the author(s) and the journal;</li> <li class="show">The right to administer permission to use portions of the article as requested by others, seeking recompense when the CJSAE sees it as warrented;</li> <li class="show">The right to seek or take advantage of opportunities to have the article included in a database aimed at increasing awareness of it;</li> <li class="show">As the author(s), the CJSAE wishes you to retain the right to republish the article, with acknowledgement of the CJSAE as the original publisher, in whole or in part, in any other pbulication of your own, including any anthology that you might edit with up to three others;</li> <li class="show">As the author(s), the CJSAE withes you to retain the right to place the article on your personal Web page or that of your university or institution. The CJSAE askes that you include this notice: A fully edited, peer-reviewed version of this article was first published by the Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education, &lt;Year&gt;, &lt;Volume&gt;, &lt;Issue&gt;, &lt;Page Numbers&gt;.</li> </ol> <p>BY AGREEING TO THE FOREGOING, YOU CONFIRM THAT THE MANUSCRIPT YOU ARE SUBMITTING HAS NOT BEEN PUBLISHED ELSEWHERE IN WHOLE OR IN PART, AND THAT NO AGREEMENT TO PUBLISH IS OUTSTANDING.</p> <p>SHOULD THE ARTICLE CONTAIN MATERIAL WHICH REQUIRES WRITTEN PERMISSION FOR INCLUSION, YOU AGREE THAT IT IS YOUR OBLIGATION IN LAW TO IDENTIFY SUCH MATERIAL TO THE EDITOR OF THE CJSAE AND TO OBTAIN SUCH PERMISSION. THE CJSAE WILL NOT PAY ANY PERMISSION FEES. SHOULD THE CJSAE BE OF THE OPINION THAT SUCH PERMISSION IS NECESSARY, IT WILL REQUIRE YOU TO PURSUE SHUCH PERMISSSION PRIOR TO PUBLICATION.</p> <p>AS AUTHOR(S), YOU WARRANT THAT THE ARTICLE BEING SUBMITTED IS ORIGINAL TO YOU.</p> <p>Provided the foregoing terms are satisfactory, and that you are in agreement with them, please indicate your acceptance by checking the appropriate box and proceed with your submission.</p> <p><em><strong>This copyright agreement was extracted with permission from the "Best practices guide to scholarly journal publishing" (2007), produced by the Canadian Association of Learned Journals (CALJ).</strong></em></p> Meanings of Quebec’s Linguistic Integration Program as Perceived by Recent Immigrants https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5635 <p>The meanings and effects of government-funded language training programs is an important research subject because it concerns possible prejudices against immigrants and negative stereotypes as well as discussions on the effectiveness of immigrant integration policies in general. The effects of civic integration programs are difficult to measure, and there is insufficient research devoted to such analysis. This study, by applying quantitative content analysis to examine the responses of 73 participants in a linguistic integration program, found the most essential meanings of the program that can be revealed only through personal participation. The results of this study can be used to evaluate language training programs for adult newcomers and provide ideas on which elements of the educational process should receive special attention from teachers and employers of language programs.</p> Anna Zagrebina Copyright (c) 2022 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2022-07-27 2022-07-27 34 1 33 47 10.56105/cjsae.v34i1.5635 Raconter les contributions des femmes à l’éducation des adultes https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5661 <p class="p1">For many researchers in adult education, it is important to have a good understanding of the field in order to better imagine the future of adult education. As in many fields, the role of women has not always been highlighted. Over time, it becomes more and more difficult to tell a story that includes women’s contributions because few written archives document their agency. This study applies oral history methodologies to collect the testimonials of four women contributors to adult education. By analyzing and interpreting their journeys, we identified the following themes: alliances between adult education and women’s movements, the collective dimension of testimonials collected that lead to social transformation, and the pedagogical potential of collecting, interpreting, and sharing the oral histories of people who may be rendered invisible by history.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> Audrey Dahl Copyright (c) 2022 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2022-07-27 2022-07-27 34 1 10.56105/cjsae.v34i1.5661 Exploring Interprofessional Learning in Collaborative Care Teams https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5639 <p>This study focuses on interprofessional learning and education in collaborative care teams in primary health care. Using a case study methodology, the researcher collected data through semi-structured interviews and document analysis. Through purposeful sampling, the study explores the experiences of five diverse health professionals (two nurses, two dietitians, one physician) working within collaborative care. A critical incident framework approach was used to identify interprofessional learning themes, which were classified as collaborative, continuous, and reflective. The study identified enablers to interprofessional learning as supportive time and space, trusting relationships, and shared values among team members. The interpretive framework of this study aligned experiential learning, situated cognition, and reflective practice learning theories to support the interprofessional learning process within collaborative practice teams. The study affirms the importance of informal interprofessional learning among health-care professionals.</p> Sarah O’Brien Leona English Copyright (c) 2022 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2022-07-27 2022-07-27 34 1 66 83 10.56105/cjsae.v34i1.5639 It’s Never Too Late to Start Again https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5607 <p>This qualitative phenomenological study describes the experiences of female students in a rural Alberta vocational training centre through semi-structured interviews. The findings indicate five key ways that instructors and institutions can approach instruction to maximize the opportunity for early and sustained student engagement: a sense of belonging and feeling of community, relationships with instructors, consistent and clear organization and structure, the recognition of student success, and the opportunity to explore new skills and careers.</p> Stephanie Solarz Copyright (c) 2022 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2022-07-27 2022-07-27 34 1 85 100 10.56105/cjsae.v34i1.5607 Tracing the Threads https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5613 <p>While spirituality has emerged as a topic of interest in adult education, much of the current scholarship considers spirituality as distinct from religion. This literature review questions those conclusions, including the use of theistic terminology to describe a concept (spirituality) that many posit is non-theistic. Spirituality is also considered in terms of transformative learning theory and spiritually centred transformation, specifically as a type of non-cognitive transformation. In this way, spirituality is placed alongside other types of affective or emotionally based ways of knowing, learning, and transforming. Finally, experiences of religious doubt—defined as dissonance or uncertainty in one’s religious and faith beliefs—are identified as potential catalysts that launch the transformative learning process. The review concludes by identifying the need for more research into the intersections of religious doubt and transformative learning in terms of what this research might tell us about the nature of both doubt and transformation.</p> Michael MacKenzie Copyright (c) 2022 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2022-07-27 2022-07-27 34 1 10.56105/cjsae.v34i1.5613 Transforming Consent Conversations https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5678 <p>This case study explores the experiences of nine female-identifying feminist public educators working with Ontario, Canada, sexual assault centres who regularly facilitate discussions about sexual consent and gender-based sexual violence in schools, post-secondary institutions, and community workshops. The educators discuss their experiences of adaptation and “inoculations” for inspiring transformative learning in their audiences, and the ways in which their practice and person have been transformed through their profession. With a focus on the relationships between intersectional feminist pedagogy, social justice education, transformative learning, and public pedagogy, the educators describe their resilience from trauma, critical thinking, and self-reflective practice, highlighting the benefits of co-facilitation, debriefing with colleagues, and mentorship.</p> Lisa Trefzger Clarke Copyright (c) 2022 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2022-07-27 2022-07-27 34 1 10.56105/cjsae.v34i1.5678 Bearing Witness to 2022 as Educators, Learners, and Humans https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5682 Robin Neustaeter Copyright (c) 2022 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2022-07-27 2022-07-27 34 1 I IX 10.56105/cjsae.v34i1.5682 Anti-racist Adult Education https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5681 <p>In this interview with the editors-in-chief of the Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education, Professor Stephen Brookfield reflects on what it means to be an anti-racist adult educator.</p> Stephen Brookfield Robin Neustaeter Adam Perry Copyright (c) 2022 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2022-07-27 2022-07-27 34 1 XI XXXI 10.56105/cjsae.v34i1.5681