Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae <p>Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education is a refereed scholarly journal committed to the dissemination of knowledge derived from disciplined inquiry in the field of adult and continuing education. CJSAE is published twice yearly for the Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/l'Association Canadienne pour l'Étude de l'Éducation des Adultes.</p> The Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education en-US Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education 0835-4944 <p>Authors of manuscripts accepted for publication will be required to assign copyright to the<em> Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes (CJSAE). </em>CJSAE requests that, as the creator(s)/author(s) of the manuscript your are submitting assign certain rights to the manuscript to the CJSAE in exchange for undertaking to publish the article in print and electronic form and, in general, to pursue its dissemination throughout the world. The rights the CJSAE requests are:</p> <ol> <li class="show">The right to publish the article in print and electronic form or in any other form it may choose that is in keeping with its role as a scholarly journal with the goal of disseminating the work as widely as possible;</li> <li class="show">The right to be the sole publisher of the article for a period of 12 months;</li> <li class="show">The right to make the article available to the public within a period of not more than 24 months, as determined by relevant journal staff of the CJSAE;</li> <li class="show">The right to grant republication rights to itself or others in print, electronic, or any other form, with any revenues accrued to be shared equally between the author(s) and the journal;</li> <li class="show">The right to administer permission to use portions of the article as requested by others, seeking recompense when the CJSAE sees it as warrented;</li> <li class="show">The right to seek or take advantage of opportunities to have the article included in a database aimed at increasing awareness of it;</li> <li class="show">As the author(s), the CJSAE wishes you to retain the right to republish the article, with acknowledgement of the CJSAE as the original publisher, in whole or in part, in any other pbulication of your own, including any anthology that you might edit with up to three others;</li> <li class="show">As the author(s), the CJSAE withes you to retain the right to place the article on your personal Web page or that of your university or institution. The CJSAE askes that you include this notice: A fully edited, peer-reviewed version of this article was first published by the Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education, &lt;Year&gt;, &lt;Volume&gt;, &lt;Issue&gt;, &lt;Page Numbers&gt;.</li> </ol> <p>BY AGREEING TO THE FOREGOING, YOU CONFIRM THAT THE MANUSCRIPT YOU ARE SUBMITTING HAS NOT BEEN PUBLISHED ELSEWHERE IN WHOLE OR IN PART, AND THAT NO AGREEMENT TO PUBLISH IS OUTSTANDING.</p> <p>SHOULD THE ARTICLE CONTAIN MATERIAL WHICH REQUIRES WRITTEN PERMISSION FOR INCLUSION, YOU AGREE THAT IT IS YOUR OBLIGATION IN LAW TO IDENTIFY SUCH MATERIAL TO THE EDITOR OF THE CJSAE AND TO OBTAIN SUCH PERMISSION. THE CJSAE WILL NOT PAY ANY PERMISSION FEES. SHOULD THE CJSAE BE OF THE OPINION THAT SUCH PERMISSION IS NECESSARY, IT WILL REQUIRE YOU TO PURSUE SHUCH PERMISSSION PRIOR TO PUBLICATION.</p> <p>AS AUTHOR(S), YOU WARRANT THAT THE ARTICLE BEING SUBMITTED IS ORIGINAL TO YOU.</p> <p>Provided the foregoing terms are satisfactory, and that you are in agreement with them, please indicate your acceptance by checking the appropriate box and proceed with your submission.</p> <p><em><strong>This copyright agreement was extracted with permission from the "Best practices guide to scholarly journal publishing" (2007), produced by the Canadian Association of Learned Journals (CALJ).</strong></em></p> CASAE’s 40th Anniversary Issue https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5655 Robert Mizzi Copyright (c) 2021 Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education 2021-11-10 2021-11-10 33 2 Notre numéro 40e anniversaire de l'acééa https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5663 Robert Mizzi Copyright (c) 2021 Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education 2021-11-10 2021-11-10 33 2 Forty Years Later https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5652 Hongxia Shan Cindy Hanson Copyright (c) 2021 Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education 2021-11-10 2021-11-10 33 2 Quarante ans plus tard https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5664 Hongxia Shan Cindy Hanson Copyright (c) 2021 Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education 2021-11-10 2021-11-10 33 2 A CJSAE Editors’ Reflective Dialogue https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5646 <p>Five editors reflect on their experiences as being editors of the Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education (CJSAE). One thread that emerges from this conversation is that leading the journal requires a broad effort involving many people who are deeply committed to academic work and social change. A second thread is that the CJSAE does more than publish articles. It builds community, provides a vital knowledge resource, and advances adult education and social development in Canada.</p> Robert Mizzi Nancy Taber Leona English Donovan Plumb Scott MacPhail Copyright (c) 2021 Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education 2021-11-10 2021-11-10 33 2 Community Development in Canadian Adult Education https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5594 <p>This content analysis aims to explore how community development has been conceived in Canadian adult education based on publications of the Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education from 2009 to 2019. This article is motivated by the understanding that community development is an intrinsic part of the Canadian adult education history and is also a way to celebrate the 40<sup>th</sup> anniversary of CJSAE. I suggest that there are five ways to conceive community development within Canadian adult education in the period analyzed: classroom-based and research-based community development, transnational feminist radical community-led development, feminist empowerment focused community development, film festivals as community development, and queer activism and community development. I conclude by saying that despite community development being a terminology seldom explored in the articles, the commitment to building communities to liberate and transform society is still the driving force that moves us forward in our field.</p> Welly Sousa Copyright (c) 2021 Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education 2021-11-10 2021-11-10 33 2 Learning from a Decade of the Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education Publications https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5633 <p>Informed by critical feminisms, we undertook a cartography of publications in the Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education (CJSAE) from 2009 to 2019. We focused on two sets of publications: those that reported on community-based research (CBR) methods and those that aimed to address marginalization as a mode of oppression, with a particular interest in those articles in which CBR and marginalization intersect. Our explorations led us to reflect on important shifts in CBR reported in CJSAE in the decade of study, as well as persistent tensions surrounding the recognition of this research within mainstream academia. We also observed that the theorization of marginalization, and how this concept is taken up with respect to researcher positionality and the politics of research, requires more attention in adult education research. We interpret adult education research as an institution, a regime of truth (Smith, 1987) that opens and/or forecloses possibilities for social transformation, with implications for academic practices and the democratization of knowledge.</p> Shauna Jane Butterwick Suzanne Smythe Jing Li Copyright (c) 2021 Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education 2021-11-10 2021-11-10 33 2 Looking Forward https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5638 <p> For 40 years, the Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education has been instrumental in promoting debate on critical pedagogy and sharing best practices in transformative education. In 2020, it became clear that we were in a new digital age, as the threat of the coronavirus resulted in a paradigmatic global shift in how we do “all the things.” This paper argues that it is no longer useful for critics to simply reject the digital through drawing three conclusions: (a) it is crucial to build the new with the old, by complimenting decades of critical pedagogical theorization; (b) the moment to deepen our critical analysis is a moment to accept the digital era in an “it’s here, it’s now—what’s next?” framework; and (c) articulating digital critical pedagogy as an approach about both doing—equipping learners with agility and fluency —and thinking—developing and applying a critical analytical social justice lens. Adopting critical digital pedagogy in contemporary democratic societies is vital to ensure future generations are not only digital but fluent and, importantly, critical. </p> Rusa Jeremic Copyright (c) 2021 Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education 2021-11-10 2021-11-10 33 2 A Decade of ‘Literacy’ in the CJSAE https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5629 <p>In our paper, we examine the ways academic writers have taken up the concept of literacy in the pages of CJSAE since 2011. We discuss key policy events from the last decade to provide a broad context for how adult literacy has been conceptualized and researched in CJSAE. We then review publications that discuss adult basic literacy in CJSAE as well as articles that we describe as ‘adjacent’ to adult literacy: their interests or sites of study overlap, but are not explicitly linked, with adult basic literacy. Finally, we interrogate the tension between these two groups of publications and consider the implications of an absence of adult basic literacy in CJSAE for adult learners and practitioners.</p> Stacey Crooks Paula Elias Annie Luk Copyright (c) 2021 Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education 2021-11-10 2021-11-10 33 2 University-Based Approaches for Older Adults: Adapting Universities for the 100-year Lifespan https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5634 <p>This study, <em>University-Based Approaches for Older Adults: Adapting Universities for the 100-year Lifespan,</em>uses the McGill Community for Lifelong Learning (MCLL) as a case study to probe issues related to seniors’ learning within university contexts, including demographics, effects of learning on the lives of older adults, mutual benefits and expectations for learners and the university community of which they are members. The intention of this research is to enable the continuous improvement of MCLL and, given national and international demographic shifts, to add new perspectives to the literature on the increasingly vital topic of continuing to learn throughout the lifespan.</p> <p>This study adds to the literature regarding seniors’ learning and the role of universities by providing an important case study that highlights the voices of older adults. The work provides observations and recommendations that can help to inform other universities and their practices regarding this demographic.</p> Judith Potter Copyright (c) 2021 Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education 2021-11-10 2021-11-10 33 2 Linking the Past, Present, and Future of Canada's Adult and Continuing Education Unit: A Conceptual Paper for Post-2020 Times https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5631 <p>In this conceptual paper, the authors consider how select themes found in the <em>Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education</em> from 2010-2020, other theoretical principles and practices from the broader education literature, and the lived experiences of adult and continuing education units in 2020 will shape the future of adult and continuing education practice for years to come. Attributes of adult and continuing education units that will thrive and assist Canada in re-building in a post-2020 world include sustained investment in on-line educational technologies; programming that enables displaced workers to re-enter the workplace expeditiously through alternate pathways and credentials as well as health- and socially-focused programs given Canada’s aging population and the social consequences of 2020; recognition of the prior achievements of adult learners including those from immigrant backgrounds; and tighter bonds between adult and continuing education units and the larger Academy including its teaching, learning, and scholarship communities.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Lorraine Carter Diane Janes Copyright (c) 2021 Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education 2021-11-10 2021-11-10 33 2 Taking Stock of Research on Immigration and Adult Education in Canada: 1981- 2020 https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5610 <p>This article takes stock of research on immigration and adult education in Canada between 1981 and 2020. Drawing on intersectionality theory, the analysis focuses on how race, gender, class, and sexual orientation intersect to shape the experiences of adult immigrant learners in producing social inequality. The findings reveal that although Canadian adult educators have progressively adopted an intersectional approach to the study of immigrant experiences in Canada, this shift is insufficient for building inclusive learning spaces that are capable of assisting marginalized immigrants in overcoming multifaceted challenges in the host society. In light of this, we propose an <em>integrative intersectional framework</em> that goes beyond the existing triple analysis embracing racialized immigrants as actors and agents of change with reference to the specifics of everyday reality through the struggle for identity and social equality. This approach also allows adult educators to examine the internal and external layers of complexity between social categories and structural power, constructing a more integrative landscape to capture social and power relations.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> Shibao Guo Jingzhou Liu Copyright (c) 2021 Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education 2021-11-10 2021-11-10 33 2 Adult Education and Lifelong Learning in Canada https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5659 Adam Perry Copyright (c) 2021 Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education 2021-11-10 2021-11-10 33 2 The Handbook of Adult and Continuing Education https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5662 <p><strong>The Handbook of Adult and Continuing Education, (2020). </strong><strong>Rocco, T. S., Smith, M. C., Mizzi, R. C., Merriweather, L. R., &amp; Hawley, J. D. (Eds).&nbsp;American Association for Adult and Continuing Education &amp; Stylus Publishing.</strong></p> Bruno de Oliveira Jayme Copyright (c) 2021 Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education 2021-11-10 2021-11-10 33 2