Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae <p>Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education is a refereed scholarly journal committed to the dissemination of knowledge derived from disciplined inquiry in the field of adult and continuing education. CJSAE is published twice yearly for the Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/l'Association Canadienne pour l'Étude de l'Éducation des Adultes.</p> The Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education en-US Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education 0835-4944 <p>Authors of manuscripts accepted for publication will be required to assign copyright to the<em> Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes (CJSAE). </em>CJSAE requests that, as the creator(s)/author(s) of the manuscript your are submitting assign certain rights to the manuscript to the CJSAE in exchange for undertaking to publish the article in print and electronic form and, in general, to pursue its dissemination throughout the world. The rights the CJSAE requests are:</p> <ol> <li class="show">The right to publish the article in print and electronic form or in any other form it may choose that is in keeping with its role as a scholarly journal with the goal of disseminating the work as widely as possible;</li> <li class="show">The right to be the sole publisher of the article for a period of 12 months;</li> <li class="show">The right to make the article available to the public within a period of not more than 24 months, as determined by relevant journal staff of the CJSAE;</li> <li class="show">The right to grant republication rights to itself or others in print, electronic, or any other form, with any revenues accrued to be shared equally between the author(s) and the journal;</li> <li class="show">The right to administer permission to use portions of the article as requested by others, seeking recompense when the CJSAE sees it as warrented;</li> <li class="show">The right to seek or take advantage of opportunities to have the article included in a database aimed at increasing awareness of it;</li> <li class="show">As the author(s), the CJSAE wishes you to retain the right to republish the article, with acknowledgement of the CJSAE as the original publisher, in whole or in part, in any other pbulication of your own, including any anthology that you might edit with up to three others;</li> <li class="show">As the author(s), the CJSAE withes you to retain the right to place the article on your personal Web page or that of your university or institution. The CJSAE askes that you include this notice: A fully edited, peer-reviewed version of this article was first published by the Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education, &lt;Year&gt;, &lt;Volume&gt;, &lt;Issue&gt;, &lt;Page Numbers&gt;.</li> </ol> <p>BY AGREEING TO THE FOREGOING, YOU CONFIRM THAT THE MANUSCRIPT YOU ARE SUBMITTING HAS NOT BEEN PUBLISHED ELSEWHERE IN WHOLE OR IN PART, AND THAT NO AGREEMENT TO PUBLISH IS OUTSTANDING.</p> <p>SHOULD THE ARTICLE CONTAIN MATERIAL WHICH REQUIRES WRITTEN PERMISSION FOR INCLUSION, YOU AGREE THAT IT IS YOUR OBLIGATION IN LAW TO IDENTIFY SUCH MATERIAL TO THE EDITOR OF THE CJSAE AND TO OBTAIN SUCH PERMISSION. THE CJSAE WILL NOT PAY ANY PERMISSION FEES. SHOULD THE CJSAE BE OF THE OPINION THAT SUCH PERMISSION IS NECESSARY, IT WILL REQUIRE YOU TO PURSUE SHUCH PERMISSSION PRIOR TO PUBLICATION.</p> <p>AS AUTHOR(S), YOU WARRANT THAT THE ARTICLE BEING SUBMITTED IS ORIGINAL TO YOU.</p> <p>Provided the foregoing terms are satisfactory, and that you are in agreement with them, please indicate your acceptance by checking the appropriate box and proceed with your submission.</p> <p><em><strong>This copyright agreement was extracted with permission from the "Best practices guide to scholarly journal publishing" (2007), produced by the Canadian Association of Learned Journals (CALJ).</strong></em></p> A Case Study in Practice Architecture https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5672 <p>This paper investigates a trajectory of forty years of evolving practices in grassroots community development in southwestern Ontario.&nbsp;We present it as a case study that yields fresh perspectives in socially transformative ways of knowing and discovering.&nbsp;In doing so, we aim to elucidate traditions in adult education and social transformation that have ‘flown under the radar.’ Our analysis is based on hermeneutic analysis of written sources. Taking a practice theory perspective, we explore the <em>practice architectures</em>, i.e. the cultural-discursive arrangements, material-economic arrangements, as well as social-political arrangements that enable or constrain the learning of and participation in particular practices that contribute to social innovation. Our findings suggest that the application of a practice theory framework to the complex and often unarticulated work of community development aids in bringing to light the creative ways in which the associated practices emerge, get shaped and acquired. We will conclude by discussing implications for adult learning and community development.</p> Michael Bernhard Christa Van Daele Copyright (c) 2023 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2023-12-19 2023-12-19 35 02 10.56105/cjsae.v35i02.5672 Navigating Everyday Multiculturalism in the Culture Chats Writing Program https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5630 <p>Taking a grounded approach to multiculturalism and the lens of informal learning and community of practice, this study reports findings from a community-based collaborative research project that explored a group of immigrant women writers’ perceptions of and experiences with multiculturalism in a community writing workshop in Metro Vancouver, a highly multicultural and multilingual regional district in the Province of British Columbia. Drawing on observation, interviews, and written artifacts created by women writers regarding their experiences with and reflection on everyday multicultural encounters, we illustrate how learning possibilities and multilayered dimensions of multiculturalism unfolded within the quotidian intercultural setting of the writing workshop, and how the shared practices of writing and intercultural communication contributed to the construction of an ephemeral community of “hybrid knowing and knowledge.”</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Jing Li Copyright (c) 2023 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2023-12-19 2023-12-19 35 02 10.56105/cjsae.v35i02.5630 Doing Migration in Adulthood https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5688 <p>Among the well-documented challenges faced by newcomers to Canada is the possession of Canadian experience (CE) as a prerequisite for successful entry into the labour market. Building on discussions that highlight the exclusionary functions of the CE discourse, this paper employs Dewey’s concept of active and passive experience and applies a doing migration framework in order to study how individuals interact with this discourse. Empirically, this paper draws on narrative interviews conducted with individuals with tertiary education who moved to Canada in adulthood. Using the documentary method, I identified three modes of engagement with CE discourse as replay and readjust, reset and move forward, and research and pro-act. Results illuminate the various forms of engagement, highlighting active, passive, and relational dimensions of doing migration. Concluding, I argue that such relational perspective has implications for adult education and the approaches taken to support individuals as they settle into life in Canada, as well as for theoretical perspectives on learning.</p> Michael Bernhard Copyright (c) 2023 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2023-12-19 2023-12-19 35 02 10.56105/cjsae.v35i02.5688 Parenting the Phoenix https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5658 <p>For many parents of transgender or non-binary children the experience is transformative learning (Mezirow, 1978). This life history study of 17 parents of children aged 6 to 29 comprised of 33 interviews, 10 participant journals, and an autoethnography. Findings from the data indicated parental learning was a holistic experience (Illeris, 2003), a balance of emotion, cognition, and sociality. When one domain of learning was overstimulated, learning could be disrupted. Parents restructured their conceptions of gender, working through understandings of gender from their past and new ideas of the present. Learning also occurred in two phases, a private phase of cognitive reframing and then a more public phase as parents learned to advocate for their child. Most parents were anchored by value of authenticity, and some mothers revisited the notion of “What makes a woman?” For some, working through discomfort was one part of the learning process.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Elizabeth McNeilly Copyright (c) 2023 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2023-12-19 2023-12-19 35 02 10.56105/cjsae.v35i02.5658 The Place of Culture in French Curricula and Textbooks in Common Basic Education https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5739 <p>In recent years, the role of culture in education has garnered growing attention. An increasing number of researchers are exploring cultural mechanisms for classroom use and ways in which teachers can foster cultural awareness. Despite this, we found no research on the place of culture in liberal adult education and, more specifically, in common basic education. The following article speaks to the results of our research on the place of culture in the curricula and textbooks, where we examined the material presented and distributed at a liberal adult education center in the Laurentians to define the cultural notions in place and the importance granted to them.</p> Caroline Monette Copyright (c) 2023 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2023-12-19 2023-12-19 35 02 10.56105/cjsae.v35i02.5739 Welcome Back https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5726 <p>Returning to education to complete Grade 12 or improve high school grades after a period away can be an overwhelming and or anxiety inducing event for many students. Upon their return to education, many factors contribute to student persistence relating to completion in Adult Basic Education (ABE). It is essential to understand these factors to ensure student success in these types of programs, particularly in rural areas. The current study samples 12 ABE students through attending a regional college in Southwest Saskatchewan. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and reviewed through thematic analysis to identify barriers and supports in ABE programing. The study found that several supports—including flexibility, class size, and educators—were seen by students as contributing to persistence. Barriers to persistence with ABE centered around three themes: external factors, educational experiences, and personal experiences. The study finds that students in ABE programing are looking for positive relationships with educators and flexible program schedules to accommodate their adult life commitments.</p> Conor Barker Grace Madden Bonnie Petersen Copyright (c) 2023 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2023-12-19 2023-12-19 35 02 10.56105/cjsae.v35i02.5726 Review of Educating for Action https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5743 Christopher Palmer Copyright (c) 2023 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2023-12-19 2023-12-19 35 02 10.56105/cjsae.v35i02.5743 Review of The Costs of Completion: Student Success in Community College https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5731 Danielle Gardiner Milln Copyright (c) 2023 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2023-12-19 2023-12-19 35 02 10.56105/cjsae.v35i02.5731 Women Pirates Learning Through Legitimate Peripheral Participation https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5745 <p><em>In this field note article, I discuss my</em><em> in-progress historical novel about privateering in the 17<sup>th</sup> century</em><em> to demonstrate how </em><em>adult education feminist theories of situated learning have influenced my fiction-based research. I introduce situated learning in gendered communities of practice, explain women’s experiences in (para)military organizations, and describe fiction-based research. I then compare theoretical concepts and quotations with excerpts from my fiction to explore feminist situated learning adult education theories, women in non-traditional roles, fiction-based research, and how women’s lives from the 17<sup>th</sup> century connect to those in the 21<sup>st</sup>. I conclude with a discussion of how adult educators can use fiction to engage with theory in their own teaching and research. In ways similar to </em><em>Watson (2016), who argues that “</em><em>fiction offers sociologists a medium for doing sociological work” (p. 434), in this article, I explore how fiction can offer adult educators a medium for doing pedagogical work.</em></p> Nancy Taber Copyright (c) 2023 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2023-12-19 2023-12-19 35 02 123 132 10.56105/cjsae.v35i02.5745 Looking Back and Looking Forward https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5597 <p class="APAAbstractText"><span lang="EN-US">This essay relates the learning journey that I have been on as a non-Indigenous post-secondary educator teaching college courses in an Indigenous community and engaging in learning and unlearning about Indigenous Peoples and their history and world views in Canada. What I wish I had known before teaching college courses on reserve includes (1) more about Indigenous Peoples and their history in Canada, and (2) the four Rs of my responsibility as a non-Indigenous post-secondary educator. My journey of learning and unlearning has just begun and will be ongoing as Indigenous history is long and complicated, and Indigenous knowledges embrace contextual knowledge and relationships emerging from a specific Indigenous epistemology.</span></p> Bora Kim Copyright (c) 2023 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2023-12-19 2023-12-19 35 02 10.56105/cjsae.v35i02.5597