Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae <p>Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education is a refereed scholarly journal committed to the dissemination of knowledge derived from disciplined inquiry in the field of adult and continuing education. CJSAE is published twice yearly for the Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/l'Association Canadienne pour l'Étude de l'Éducation des Adultes.</p> The Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education en-US Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education 0835-4944 <p>Authors of manuscripts accepted for publication will be required to assign copyright to the<em> Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes (CJSAE). </em>CJSAE requests that, as the creator(s)/author(s) of the manuscript your are submitting assign certain rights to the manuscript to the CJSAE in exchange for undertaking to publish the article in print and electronic form and, in general, to pursue its dissemination throughout the world. The rights the CJSAE requests are:</p> <ol> <li class="show">The right to publish the article in print and electronic form or in any other form it may choose that is in keeping with its role as a scholarly journal with the goal of disseminating the work as widely as possible;</li> <li class="show">The right to be the sole publisher of the article for a period of 12 months;</li> <li class="show">The right to make the article available to the public within a period of not more than 24 months, as determined by relevant journal staff of the CJSAE;</li> <li class="show">The right to grant republication rights to itself or others in print, electronic, or any other form, with any revenues accrued to be shared equally between the author(s) and the journal;</li> <li class="show">The right to administer permission to use portions of the article as requested by others, seeking recompense when the CJSAE sees it as warrented;</li> <li class="show">The right to seek or take advantage of opportunities to have the article included in a database aimed at increasing awareness of it;</li> <li class="show">As the author(s), the CJSAE wishes you to retain the right to republish the article, with acknowledgement of the CJSAE as the original publisher, in whole or in part, in any other pbulication of your own, including any anthology that you might edit with up to three others;</li> <li class="show">As the author(s), the CJSAE withes you to retain the right to place the article on your personal Web page or that of your university or institution. The CJSAE askes that you include this notice: A fully edited, peer-reviewed version of this article was first published by the Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education, &lt;Year&gt;, &lt;Volume&gt;, &lt;Issue&gt;, &lt;Page Numbers&gt;.</li> </ol> <p>BY AGREEING TO THE FOREGOING, YOU CONFIRM THAT THE MANUSCRIPT YOU ARE SUBMITTING HAS NOT BEEN PUBLISHED ELSEWHERE IN WHOLE OR IN PART, AND THAT NO AGREEMENT TO PUBLISH IS OUTSTANDING.</p> <p>SHOULD THE ARTICLE CONTAIN MATERIAL WHICH REQUIRES WRITTEN PERMISSION FOR INCLUSION, YOU AGREE THAT IT IS YOUR OBLIGATION IN LAW TO IDENTIFY SUCH MATERIAL TO THE EDITOR OF THE CJSAE AND TO OBTAIN SUCH PERMISSION. THE CJSAE WILL NOT PAY ANY PERMISSION FEES. SHOULD THE CJSAE BE OF THE OPINION THAT SUCH PERMISSION IS NECESSARY, IT WILL REQUIRE YOU TO PURSUE SHUCH PERMISSSION PRIOR TO PUBLICATION.</p> <p>AS AUTHOR(S), YOU WARRANT THAT THE ARTICLE BEING SUBMITTED IS ORIGINAL TO YOU.</p> <p>Provided the foregoing terms are satisfactory, and that you are in agreement with them, please indicate your acceptance by checking the appropriate box and proceed with your submission.</p> <p><em><strong>This copyright agreement was extracted with permission from the "Best practices guide to scholarly journal publishing" (2007), produced by the Canadian Association of Learned Journals (CALJ).</strong></em></p> Participation and Persistence of Adult Basic Education Students at a Rural College Campus on Manitoulin Island https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5640 <p class="APAAbstractText"><span lang="EN-US">Little research has been conducted to examine the participation and persistence of adult basic education students in northern and rural Canada. This explanatory sequential mixed-methods study was conducted with adult learners to address this research deficit. The study consisted of questionnaire and interview phases. Using thematic analysis, five themes were identified from the participant responses: (a) positive, supportive, personal touch; (b) situational hardships; (c) friendships and community; (d) campus Indigeneity; and (e) program resources. Situational hardships directly affected students’ program participation and persistence. A positive, supportive environment contributed to participation and persistence, while friends, community, and program resources influenced student persistence in the program. Participants identified campus Indigeneity and promotion of the program as areas for improvement.</span></p> Christopher Prechotko Dale Kirby Copyright (c) 2022 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2023-01-11 2023-01-11 34 02 29 55 Rethinking Postsecondary Access and Engagement for Low-income Adult Learners Through a Community Hub Partnership Approach https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5669 <p>This paper draws upon a case study of a campus-community partnership program in Ontario that delivers tuition-free college courses to low-income adult learners in community hub locations. By co-locating college classrooms in existing neighbourhood gathering places (i.e., a community centre and a public library), our research explores whether integrating college capacity and resources in community hub locations can help increase the accessibility of post-secondary education. In doing so, we address a gap in the research in exploring how community hubs provide a support structure that can help boost the motivation of low-income adult learners and better facilitate their pathway to a post-secondary education. Drawing upon a thematic analysis of interview data, we (a) analyze partners’ perspectives on the community hub–based approach in bolstering the accessibility of higher education, (b) reflect on the process of campus-community engagement underpinning the partnership structure, and (c) critically assess the efficacy of the community hub model in connecting learners with an educational pathway.</p> Alan Bourke Clara Tascón James Vanderveken Emily Ecker Copyright (c) 2022 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2023-01-11 2023-01-11 34 02 89 105 Braiding Our Lives https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5628 <p>Adult literacy is a pressing policy issue in Canada. Reports reveal immigrant communities as accounting for a relatively large share of the country’s population experiencing low reading, writing, numeracy, and information processing skills. This paper explores how Black immigrant women who are adult literacy learners negotiate and reconfigure their motherwork while living abroad in Toronto with their families. This article presents insights obtained from six in-depth interviews with African Caribbean mothers living in Toronto. In these interviews, participants shared stories that centre the following questions: What are the literacy experiences of Black immigrant mothers who are adult learners? How can we better support their literacy journey?</p> <p>Drawing on an arts-informed narrative methodology, this study compiled findings gained from interviews into the creative non-fiction story Braiding Our Lives. Braiding Our Lives captures personal narratives, shared by study participants, highlighting the central role of homeplace and cultural work in the lives of Black immigrant mothers who are literacy learners.</p> Stephanie Fearon Copyright (c) 2022 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2023-01-11 2023-01-11 34 02 7 28 Program Planner Dignity and Negotiation in Collaborative Projects https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5650 <p>In this qualitative interpretivist study, we investigated the types of interactions and negotiations that supported or constrained adult education program planners’ capacity to act, conceptualized as dignity. Data were drawn from interviews with 14 program planners working in collaborative partnerships in U.S. underperforming urban schools. Planner dignity is supported by practice-focused relationships, jointly developing new practices, and program success. Dignity is constrained by organizational hierarchy, unmanageable daily expectations, and ineffective feedback mechanisms causing distance between planners and fracturing the planning table. Dignity affirmation or constraint affect planner uncertainty regarding access to students and resources, control over one’s time, and accountability. Social conditions also affect the quality of interactions. Individualistic and competitive orientations constrain dignity and impede negotiation practices. Co-operative goal orientations support bargaining and consultative problem-solving negotiations; however, these were less common. Findings advance understanding of interactions that underlie and evolve effective negotiation.</p> Cheryl Baldwin Doug Magnuson Copyright (c) 2022 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2023-01-11 2023-01-11 34 02 73 88 Breaking the Armour and Stirring the Soul https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5709 J. Adam Perry Copyright (c) 2022 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2023-01-11 2023-01-11 34 02 i v Teaching International Students in a Difficult Time https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5648 <p class="APAAbstractText"><span lang="EN-US">The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has forced instructors and students to work together under constantly evolving circumstances. The abrupt transition to online education has contributed to making the educational experiences of instructors and students more emotionally complex and intense. Growing attention has been directed toward understanding the challenges international students face and their impact on the students’ learning experiences, considering the unprecedented difficulties the global pandemic has posed for international student mobility. In this context, instructors are in a unique position to support international students. One way to do so is by being (more) empathetic. Empathy is important because it not only helps us feel for and with the other, but also improves the academic outcomes of students. This paper discusses the importance of empathy in teaching international students by expanding on the concept of teacher empathy. This paper also critically examines the experiences of international students in higher education in several domains of lived experience, such as the linguistic, academic, social, cultural, and psychological. Other aspects of empathy presented are its contagious nature and the concept of radical empathy. This paper concludes by highlighting the practical application of empathy in light of international students’ experiences.</span></p> Vander Tavares Copyright (c) 2022 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2023-01-11 2023-01-11 34 02 57 72 Revolutionary Feminisms https://cjsae.library.dal.ca/index.php/cjsae/article/view/5708 <p>Book Review of:</p> <p>REVOLUTIONARY FEMINISMS</p> <p>Bhandar, B. &amp; Ziadah, R. Verso , 2020, 240 Pages.</p> Sara Carpenter Copyright (c) 2022 Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education/L’Association canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation des adultes 2023-01-11 2023-01-11 34 02 107 109